Lexcel supports legal excellence

16
Sep
  • Nico Lee

Cambridgeshire law firm Adams Harrison is nearing the twentieth anniversary of its first Lexcel accreditation.

Their first office achieved the Law Society’s practice management standard in 1999, and since then the business has acquired various other practices, all of which have taken on the legal kite mark. The last was their Sawston office in 2008, which achieved accreditation just 12 months later.

Lexcel accreditation provides a flexible, supportive management framework to help practices and in-house legal departments improve operations and manage risk effectively. It sets standards across seven different areas: structure and strategy, financial management, information management, people management, risk management, client care, file and case management. Lexcel scheme rules outline the design, principles and governance processes of the scheme.

Sue Lawton, practice manager at the Sawston office, is a great advocate of the standard: “Gaining accreditation is a real achievement; it’s something that we are very proud off and retaining it year after year takes a lot of effort and commitment from everyone at the firm.

“Quite often new clients aren’t aware of Lexcel, and what it stands for, so I always spend a few minutes explaining why it is so important and how it stands for legal excellence,” she says.

The firm specialises in several areas, including family law, litigation and commercial property transactions, and has a long and successful working relationship with the Centre for Assessment.

“Not only do they understand Lexcel, and its importance to the legal sector, but they also understand how law practices work and why keeping us informed of the timescales required and any changes we need to make is so important,” adds Sue

“All our employees are aware of how important Lexcel is to the practice and how it ensures we provide a high quality service,” she continues. “Staff that have joined us from non-Lexcel accredited firms have commented on the important and useful practices and procedures that we have in place as a result of Lexcel, that they didn’t have at their employers.”